For more information on the Risk and Resilience module, take a look at our methodology documents

The Risk and Resiliency module measures the potential impacts of natural hazards within a region. For the geometries inside of your Project Area, the module reports basic demographic summaries of these natural hazards. 

The module supports reporting the count of canvas geometries and their properties like affected acreage and population, as well as the number of dwelling units and jobs impacted by each type of risk. 

This provides an insight into how these hazards could impact the region both now and in different future scenarios.

The module measures impacts for three major natural hazards:

Flood 

Available across the United States, the flood analytics use the FEMA National Flood Hazard layer to compile the different Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs) into a visual representation of different areas where the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) management regulations apply and which zones they fall under

The different SFHA Zones in are populated in our Legend and can be adjusted to suit your designs using our symbology menu to adjust their swatches. See our methodology document for more on what each zone represents.

Sea Level Rise

Available across the United States, the Seal Level Rise analytics use National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provided datasets that depict inundation levels from projected sea level rise above current conditions all the way to 6 ft of sea level rise above the current Mean Higher High Water conditions (which are represented by the 0 feet layer and column).

Downtown Charleston, NC at 6 ft of Sea Level Rise.

Fire Hazard

NOTE: Within the State of California, the Fire Hazard analytics are based on CALFIRE’s high-risk fire zones. Elsewhere throughout the country, UrbanFootprint uses the US Forest Service's Fire Modeling Institute's Wildfire Hazard Potenial data set. 

This analysis takes in local input of potential fuels, terrain and historic weather patterns as well as other relevant properties and provides a clear view of local conditions to take into consideration while planning.

These areas are classified into 3 zones - Moderate (Goldenrod), High (Orange) and Very High (Red). Below is a screenshot of the hazard data for Santa Rosa, CA

Data Outputs

Charts Pane Results Breakdown

  • Canvas Features at Risk - Count of Project Area canvas geometries that are inside of a given Hazard Analysis Zone.
  • Area at Risk - Total Acreage inside of the Project Area by Hazard Analysis Zone 
  • Population at Risk - People located within your Project Area that are affected by the given Hazard Analysis Zone.
  • Dwelling Units at Risk -  Total Dwelling units located within your project area that are affected by the given Hazard Analysis Zone
  • Jobs at Risk - Local employment at risk by Hazard Analysis Zone within the project area
  • Jobs in Sea Level Rise Risk Areas - Local employment at risk by each increment of height of sea level rise.

Reporting Charts Outputs

  • Canvas Features in Flood Hazard Areas - Count of canvas geometries that are inside of a given Flood Hazard Zone.
  • Area of Flood Hazard Zones - Total acreage at risk by the given Flood Hazard Zone.
  • Dwelling Units in Flood Hazard Zones - Count of Dwelling units that fall in a given Flood Hazard Zone 
  • Population in Flood Hazard Zones - Count of Population that fall in a given Flood Hazard Zone
  • Jobs in Flood Hazard Zones - Count of Employment within the given Flood Hazard Zone
  • Canvas Features in Sea Level Rise Zones - Count of Canvas Geometries affected by the corresponding level of sea rise. 
  • Area in Sea Level Rise Zones - Total Acreage affected by the corresponding level of sea rise. 
  • Dwelling Units in Sea Level Rise Zones - Count of dwelling units affected by the corresponding level of sea rise
  • Population in Sea Level Rise Zones - Count of Population affected by the corresponding level of sea rise
  • Jobs in Sea Level Rise Zones - Count of Employment affected by the corresponding level of sea rise.
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